4/02/2011

Published on 4/02/2011 Written by 3 comments

Saturday Sorcery: More Spells by Teenage Designers


I'm back with your weekly dose of home-brewed magical goodness. Hopefully you're not getting sick of me; I'm trying to catch up with John for most posts on this site. He currently leads me about 85 to 15, but I'm gaining on him.

This week, I once again dig deep into my bag of tricks (all the way back to 1996 or so) for some 2nd-Edition priest spells. These come from a campaign I ran back in high school that was over-loaded with priests from a variety of different faiths. I encouraged the players to create their own spells to give their characters and their gods more of a distinct feel and, well, you'll see what we got. (See last week's Saturday Sorcery for more).

These spells I believe were originally imagined by Steve B, playing a priest of the god of Storms and Weather. Once again, if the balance seems screwy that's entirely my fault. I tried to force his vision into game statistics, while making sure it fit into a level he could actually cast.

So without further ado...

¥ Raincloud of Infinite Pain ¥
(Alteration, Conjuration/Summoning)
Sphere: Weather
Level: 3
Range: 0
Components: V, S, M
Duration: 1 turn/level
Casting Time: 3
Area of Effect: Special
Saving Throw: None

This spell creates a black rain cloud which envelopes the spellcaster. The cloud has a volume of approximately 5’ x 5’ x 5’. The cloud will levitate and fly, carrying the caster under his direction. The cloud can scoot along at a respectable movement rate of 12 at an altitude of up to 60 feet, but has a maneuverability class of E. The cloud can also stop in a complete hover. The caster can conceal himself inside the cloud, effectively increasing his AC by -1. However, the cloud is obviously magical and cannot be mistaken or ignored for a normal cloud.

Maintaining the cloud takes about as much concentration as walking, so the caster may cast additional spells and do other things while still maintaining a movement rate of 3.

The cloud may, once per turn, loose a light drizzle of pure rain water which lasts for one round.

At the time of the casting, the caster may opt that for the duration of the spell, his voice echoes and booms like thunder (though it is not amplified by a notable degree). However, if this option is activated, the spellcaster may not invoke any spells requiring the use of verbal components for the duration of raincloud of infinite pain.

The cloud dissipates immediately at the end of the duration, dropping the priest to the ground. The caster may cancel the spell at any time. If the caster is rendered unconscious, the spell is terminated immediately.

The material components for this spell are the priest’s holy symbol, a flask of pure rain water, and a ceramic jug. Only the flask of water is consumed in the casting.


§ Enduring Gloom §
(Abjuration)
Sphere: Weather
Level: 1
Range: 5 yards
Components: V, S, M
Duration: 1 hour/level
Casting Time: 8
Area of Effect: One creature
Saving Throw: Neg.

This spell creates a dark, black, obviously magical rain cloud which appears over the target’s head. The cloud occasionally drizzles on the target, usually just after he has dried himself. The target may make a saving throw vs. spell to attempt to avoid the effects of this curse. The cloud causes no game penalties, other than to make the victim’s life miserable (though it may cause the victim to catch a cold, at the DM’s discretion).

Enduring gloom lasts until remove curse or dispel magic is cast, or until the duration expires.

The material component for this spell is a drop of rainwater.


Like this?

3 comments:

  1. JsalvatoriApril 02, 2011

    I like Enduring Gloom. It doesn't really hurt anyone, but it's so frakking mean spirited. Love it.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I agree about Enduring Gloom. It reminds me of Rob McKenna from one of the old Douglas Adams books.

    ReplyDelete
  3. CDGallant_KingApril 04, 2011

    I think Ghosn would like this spell. He may even cast it on himself.

    ReplyDelete

Thanks for commenting at Rule of the Dice.

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...